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Posts Tagged ‘walk’

I took advantage of an unusually dry day today,  to take a bus up to the top of Varley Road (I wasn’t walking up; it’s too steep, too busy and there are no footpaths) and I then walked along Chain Road (B6107) to Marsden.  The views from up here are tremendous and now that we’re a good way into August the heather is beginning to populate the hillsides and tops.  Along with the purple thistles, and other pink/white flowering wild flowers – the colours are just beautiful.

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There is a slightly higher route, on Marsden Moor proper, alongside the water channels originally designed to move water to and from Deerhill and Butterly reservoirs, but I fancied the road route as I would return to Slaithwaite along the canal.

The canal was wet and muddy after all the rain and in places, showed signs of having been flooded at some point. Still the rain stayed off and I had a pleasant five-mile walk.

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When the weather is nice here in the UK, we can experience the most wonderful scenery. From where we live, rugged countryside is never more than a few minutes away.

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This was the final weekend that my brother and his partner will be with us, before their return to Australia.  They fly out on Thursday and return home via a short stay-over in Dubai.

Their first weekend with us was the Jubilee weekend and lots of ‘stuff’ was going on. One of those days we heard noises (music) which appeared to be coming from across the valley, so Andrew and I set off to see what it was. When we got there (across the valley) we realised that the noise was coming from our side of the valley – the side we’d set off from (doh!). In fact, the music was coming from a couple of houses in the bottom of the valley – but the point of telling the story is that whilst we were trailing about Golcar Andrew noticed the Golcar Ginnel Trail  signs. I’ve catalogued my own sightings over the years on Flickr but a couple of the plaques have remained elusive. We said that we would ‘do’ the Ginnel Trail before he set off back home.

Now that was a month ago and a lot of rain has fallen since then, so yesterday was really the last chance to undertake what seemed like an easy task. The local information leaflets say that it’s about 3km long with some tricky uphill climbs. Now, being local I thought the uphill description was spot on but that the 3km was something of an understatement – which I think it proved to be.

We set off in a short lull in the rain and only experienced short bursts of wetness as we trailed around the hills and vales that make up Golcar. The trail starts by the church and then weaves its way down and along the hillside until it reaches the railway line. This is the main Trans-Pennine line which flits folks backwards and forwards between the east and west coasts of northern England (but mainly Manchester Airport and the big cities of the north). The trail then drops further down the hill to the Huddersfield Narrow Canal.  At this point it would seem that the odd plaque has been removed/stolen/misplaced [delete as required] as there was only one at the TOP of eight and at the TOP of nine – each of the other trails having a plaque top AND bottom. This bit of the walk is also longer, with much more distance between the markers. From nine to ten, you could easily become lost and disorientated, so do make sure you have the guide with you to make sure you don’t become lost.

From here on the overarching direction is ‘UP’. Up the steep hillside to Golcar itself and for Andrew and me, even further up – to the Golcar Lily Restaurant where we were meeting family for a meal. Next time I’ll do it on a slightly warmer day 😉

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I didn’t pick a very good time to start a ‘Saturday Walk’ blog did I? They don’t seem to happen on Saturdays any more. This week my main walk took place on a Wednesday (30th December)! I’d also walked to town earlier in the week, with John T, Carol and Sharon and that was nice, but it was a very steady walk because of all the ice we had to traverse. We had a few drinks in town and then came back here for a chilli.

Both John (Rousell) and I had had some domestic problems over the last week. The weather had been so cold that we had both experienced pipe blockages and I’d also had a pipe burst in the garage. What’s more, my car had broken down on Christmas Eve, with what turned out to be a broken spring. This awaits the new year to get fixed and as a result John came to Wellhouse, from where be begun our walk.

We set off in thick fog, down the road and up towards Golcar Church, before turning left on Small Lane and across the fields to Bolster Moor. We tracked across Bolster Moor towards Waller Clough Road and then around the top edge of Slaithwaite, along Crimea Lane to Pole Moor. As far as possible, we then kept to the fields as we dropped into Slaithwaite and along the end of the still frozen reservoir. All the way we were accompanied by fog and mist and although we expected to come out of it as we got higher up the hill, it was only down on the reservoir that we actually saw the tops of hills around the lake. The frozen water seemed to be dragging the mist down to it.

Slaithwaite itself seemed to be damp and dour in the mist induced greyness and we carried straight on through and along the canal as far as Linthwaite, where we turned left and up Lowestwood Lane. Lowestwood lane is a fairly bust road, used by locals and those wanting a short cut to the M62. It starts quite steep as it approached the railway arch and then gets a bit steeper until the bend halfway up the road. Then it gets steeper still – until the top! Hard work.

It was nice to get out today and nicer still to get some exercise and have a proper chat.

 

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